Grammar Wednesday: POV–3rd Person Omniscient

So, you thought you were done with the last post? You're not. There is one more. This person is slowly becoming more popular, but there are still a lot of readers and editors and publishers and betas and such and such that don't like it. Do you know what omniscient means? Well, since I'm into … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: POV–3rd Person Omniscient

Grammar Wednesday: POV–3rd person

Third person is my favorite person to write in. I have to say, I absolutely love and adore it. Recently people have said they don't like third person because they are distanced from the character and can't get into their mind. Also, people say that it creates confusion as to what is really going on … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: POV–3rd person

The wondrous world of editing

I've been seeing a lot of posts on facebook, twitter, goodreads and more about editing and the editing process. I'm not one to miss the bandwagon. Editing is extremely important when it comes to finalizing ANYTHING, even emails to the boss. There can be some pretty blaring typos (I've made them and will continue to … Continue reading The wondrous world of editing

Grammar Wednesday: POV–1st person

I've decide the next group of grammar goodness will be about persons in writing. There are typically 3 persons, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd! Go figure, the numbers go up. First person, at least from what I have seen, is becoming far more common--that might just be because I'm seeing it more, not that it actually … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: POV–1st person

Grammar Wednesday: the “U” and the “A”

This is a common mistake that I find with my copy-editing, and it has to do with tenses, which I will eventually tackle on this blog. Drank v. Drunk Sank v. Sunk These are two that are commonly misused when speaking and even more commonly misused when writing. 1--He drank the tea. 2--He had drunk … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: the “U” and the “A”

Grammar Wednesday: ACTIVE PHRASING

Hello everyone! I know some of you were sad that I missed last week's Grammar Wednesday, but I didn't miss it. I was in Guatemala--no interwebs for a whole week! I started to go into withdrawal. Here's your Grammar Wednesday! It's about active phrasing and passive phrasing. I apparently used to write passive phrasing, and … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: ACTIVE PHRASING

Fanfic mistakes and pleasures

My time for writing originals is certainly not over, but I have been working on fanfiction, toying with the plots (which involve mostly sex) and characters. I know that there are quite a few people who do not agree with fanfic, who think it's a complete violation of the rights of the owners/creators of the … Continue reading Fanfic mistakes and pleasures

Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–rearranging

I realize that this post is going to be short, as it should be pretty self-explanatory. However, next week I will be concluding the comma splice regime with how to find comma splices. My cohort Amy is a comma splice nazi, particularly in my own work. Check out her blog, she's awesome sauce! Rearrange the … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–rearranging

Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–Em dash

Use an Em dash An Em dash will strongly connect the two independent clauses.  Em dashes to resolve comma splices are most commonly found in dialogue, where semi-colons and colons are avoided.  This is for flow of voice of the character and for flow of reading. 3. “I didn’t know you could do that, you … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–Em dash

Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–new sentence

C. Start a new sentence Starting a new sentence when encountering a comma splice will put more emphasis in both independent clauses and will create a larger break.  When you have a long run-on sentence (as in example 5), then you will most likely want a new sentence start.  This gives the reader a break … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–new sentence

Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–Semi-colon

A semi-colon is used as a way to separate the two independent clauses more than just a comma and coordinating conjunction.  A semi-colon has a firmer break in the thoughts.  A comma and coordinating conjunction is like a California stop (or a rolling stop) at a stop sign, and the semi-colon is like a full … Continue reading Grammar Wednesday: COMMA SPLICE–Semi-colon